June 29, 2022

Oxford English Dictionary declares word of the year: Vax

The Oxford English Dictionary has declared Vax as their word of the year. This is a word that is used in relation to vaccines and immunizations, but it can also be used in other contexts such as when someone wants to get vaccinated or if they are trying to avoid getting something. The word Vax was chosen by an international panel of lexicographers for its global usage across social media, newspapers, blogs and general conversation over 2017. According to the panel, vax was a word that made a surprise comeback after a period of steady decline.

Vax is defined as an action verb or noun referring to vaccination or immunisation against diseases such as measles, mumps and rubella. While the word has been in use since the late 18th century, this is the first time that it has been included as a word in the Oxford English Dictionary.

The panel of lexicographers that chose the word Vax for this year’s word of the year had three criteria:

The word must have attracted interest and created debate during 2017 The Oxford English Dictionary must be able to show evidence of the term’s widespread usage The word must be judged to reflect the ethos or preoccupations of 2017.

According to The Oxford English Dictionary, there were more than 148 million social media interactions about the vaccine in 2017, which was a significant increase on previous years. This can mainly be attributed to the rise in anti-vaccination sentiments that circulated on social media during this same period.

More recently, the panel said that vax has been used in headlines such as Is There Enough Vaccine Supply If People Who Should Get It Don’t? and What’s The Right Age To Vax A Kid Against Hep B?

The vaccine lexicon is changing, says Katherine Connor Martin , Head of US Dictionaries at Oxford University Press. In the past few years, terms such as flu shot and MMR have been joined by vax when referring to vaccination or immunization.

In a blog post published on their website, Katherine Connor Martin said In 2017, our usage of the word Vax saw a huge spike in frequency-following a general decline since the early 1990s. In 2017, we saw it used in headlines such as Is There Enough Vaccine Supply If People Who Should Get It Don’t?, and What’s The Right Age To Vax A Kid Against Hep B?

The word has also been widely adopted by celebrities, politicians and doctors alike. For example, a recent tweet by singer Katy Perry read It’s time to make the world a healthier place for our kids. Vax them up!

The vaccine lexicon is changing, says Oxford University terminology consultant Katherine Connor Martin. In the past few years, terms such as flu shot and MMR have been joined by vax when referring to vaccination or immunization.

In a blog post published on their website, Katherine Connor Martin said In 2017, our usage of the word Vax saw a huge spike in frequency-following a general decline since the early 1990s. In 2017, we saw it used in headlines such as Is There Enough Vaccine Supply If People Who Should Get It Don’t?, and What’s The Right Age To Vax A Kid Against Hep B?

The word has also been widely adopted by celebrities, politicians and doctors alike. For example, a recent tweet by singer Katy Perry read It’s time to make the world a healthier place for our kids. Vax them up!

Kristen Soltis Anderson , writer of The Selfie Vote: Where Millennials Are Leading America (And How Republicans Can Keep Up) added “Vax” to the Oxford English Dictionary for 2017, but it should have been in the dictionary much earlier.

I’m a millennial mom and I love my kids more than anything in the world, she said in an interview with The Daily Signal .